Category Archives: freedesktop.org

Goodbye Akademy 2015, See You Randa 2015

OK, Akademy 2015 ended last week. This is my second Akademy, though the first full one.

A Coruña is located on the Atlantic front and on my way there, I encountered rainy spots and the rain was a familiar one for me, after having lived several years in northern France (Paris and Pays de la Loire). But this time I actually found it quite enjoyable, knowing that I left behind a 39°-heated Lyon. So, yes, A Coruña is warmer than what we could encounter in other parts of Spain. I shared my car with Sandro Knauß, who came to Lyon from Germany by train, so the one full-day trip was quite nice, KDE hacking-oriented. But be assured, we were also able to talk lots of other topics.

The venue and the hosting in Rialta were just perfect. The local team did an awesome job when organizing the event. They had it all: welcome party – we arrived at the right moment for the Queimada – sponsored food during the week-end (thanks Blue Systems), essential goodies (they carried the VIM T-shirt), “social event” – that was really a party where I had an excellent time -, the day trip and all the schedules which weren’t difficult to follow. Rialta has free swimming pool and I actually managed to use it.

Akademy is about KDE technology but also about meeting like-minded people. Getting along together is really easy, language barrier took apart, and I actually really enjoyed just sitting there and hacking with others, then having a beer or discussing technical issues or ideas. I already miss these spontaneous late evening hacking moments.

Speaking about KDE technology, we are at a turning moment, with Plasma Mobile becoming available. KDE is now ready to take on the mobiles platforms and that’s pretty cool. I look forward to the moment when I’ll have a Linux smartphone running both KDE software and Android applications (with Shashlik, bien-sur). I’ll do my best to help and I already plan to support KSecrets Service on mobile.

KSecrets Service had it’s own BoF. The updated slides are here. I’m working right now in implementing it and that would bring us to Randa, where I intend to continue even further and hopefully I’ll even have a working version by that time.

Randa is a great location for hacking. In fact, no, not Randa, but the venue in Randa is quite perfect for that :-) They have that big room under the roof, upstairs, where I look forward to hack, between some BoF’s or swiss meals. Some people who couldn’t make it to Akademy will go to Randa, so I look forward to meeting them there. Oh, and if you can, please help them getting there by the means of a small donation.

Finally, but not less importantly, I’d like to thank KDE e.V. and the sponsors for organizing these events and for providing travel reimbursement.

KWallet needs a serious face-lift ; enter KSecret Service

Users are often confused by the current KWallet system behavior. When their computers start, they enter the KDE session password but just after logging-in, they are prompted yet another password, for something named KWallet. Sometimes, they even see several password prompts from KWallet, depending on their precise desktop configuration.

Some users find that annoying and they file bug reports or, even worse, simply uncheck the “Enable the KDE wallet subsystem” in an attempt to deactivate it as a whole and switch to using some other external tools. Well, these tools are OK, but the KDE experience is affected, as the applications are no longer able to correctly store and retrieve their secrets. And that raises the barrier to entry for some of our potential users, adding negative points against KDE.

The remaining users have now several devices and would like to have their passwords synchronized all over these devices. They won’t find this kind of function and they’ll start using some other external tools, providing cross-device synchronization. That’s another bad point for the KDE experience.

Finally, more advanced users would like to know where their wallet data is stored and they would like to be able to put their wallets in some places of their choice, perhaps in an owncloud synchronized directory.

Enter KSecret Service!

The KDE Wallet system has some design flaws (I’ll write more on that in the future, but right now my post risk to get too long) affecting the security and should be replaced ASAP. Back in 2008 and until or 2011 an initiative was taken by the former KDE Wallet maintainer Michael Leupold and Stef Walter from GNOME to create a Freedesktop.org interface aiming to replace it. It’s called “Secret Service” and the draft may be found here: http://standards.freedesktop.org/secret-service/

This interface is already implemented by GNOME keyring and AFAICT KDE should also implement this interface if it wanted to enhance users experience.

All these points will be addressed by a new system, aiming to replace KWallet. It’s name is already known – KSecret Service.

I’m in the process of (re)defining it’s architecture and I’ll post it, for feedback, on the KDE developer mailing list as soon as I’ll get something stable enough. I cannot tell more right now – the post is already long enough – but it’s an ambitious plan! And I’m sure you’ll like it!

Connecting mutt to corporate MS Exchange

Last year I finally had the opportunity to install and use Linux at my work. The background of this change is out of the scope of this posting, I can only tell you that I was waiting for it since the very beginning. So I’m a happy Fedora user since a little more than an year, at my work (at home I’m using Linux since 2003 I think – ArchLinux currently).

Working with Linux is quite interesting and productive if you one uses the right tools. That’s why I also configured http://i3wm.org/ and a whole bunch of text mode tools, mainly vim plugins (know YouCompleteMe?), but also the Ranger file manager. However, our company uses MS Exchange *without* the IMAP connector and that’s quite a problem, because it interfaces only with MS Outlook or Evolution. MS Outlook has to run under Windows, so I used a virtual machine for this, eating 1 GB of RAM. Evolution runs natively, but it also eats more than 1GB only to present me the mails or some reminders. That’s a serious problem when one uses other very memory-intensive tools like Eclipse, IntelliJ or Oracle SQL Developer, not to mention Maven or DB Solo. So I really needed a solution to reduce my working session’s footprint, to get the most out of my workstation’s 8 Gb of RAM. Some coworkers are using Citrix sessions for that, but that has the mail/workstation integration problem.

Enter davmail. This awesome little project solved a problem several of us have at work: interface an IMAP client with our corporate server. DavMail need a very minimalist configuration. It almost worked out of the box, not considering the need to enter the company’s OWA URL. Once started, I instantly got IMAP and CalDAV. It also provides iCal and CardDAV but I don’t use these so I don’t know how it works. So, I’m now using mutt to handle corporate mails, interface it with lbdb and our LDAP server. \o/

The calendar is handled with khal but I also use remind. This part needs some more work, as I still need to figure out how to create appointments on my machine, then get them synchronized to the corporate server.

Should I write a tutorial with the steps I done so far? Let me know and I’ll do it if you’re interested.

List DBus installed services

If, like me, you’re wondering if the shining new DBus service you written is correctly recognized by the DBus daemon, then issue this command:

> qdbus org.freedesktop.DBus / ListActivatableNames

You’ll get an output like this one:

org.freedesktop.DBus
org.freedesktop.Notifications
org.kde.fontinst
org.gnome.GConf
org.freedesktop.Akonadi.Control
org.gtk.vfs.Metadata
vandenoever.strigi
org.kde.kuiserver
org.gtk.Private.AfcVolumeMonitor
org.gnome.GnomeVFS.Daemon
org.kde.knotify
org.gtk.vfs.Daemon
org.freedesktop.xesam.searcher
org.openobex
org.freedesktop.secrets
org.gtk.Private.GduVolumeMonitor
org.gtk.Private.GPhoto2VolumeMonitor
ca.desrt.dconf
org.kde.krunner

All these names come from the .service files installed on your system and recognized by the dbus-daemon.